MARK Daniel TRUMBO
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Nickname:   N/A Position:   OF - 1B
Home: N/A Team:   ORIOLES
Height: 6' 4" Bats:   R
Weight: 225 Throws:   R
DOB: 1/16/1986 Agent: Wasserman Media Group
Uniform #: 45  
Birth City: Anaheim, CA
Draft: Angels #18 - 2004 - Out of high school (CA)
YR LEA TEAM SAL(K) G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO OBP SLG AVG
2005 PIO OREM   71 299 45 82 23 1 10 45 2   21 67     .274
2006 MWL CEDAR RAPIDS   118 428 43 94 19 0 13 59 5 5 44 99   .355 .220
2007 MWL CEDAR RAPIDS   128 471 57 128 27 2 14 76 10 8 34 98   .427 .272
2008 CAL RANCHO CUCAMONGA   103 407 70 115 28 2 26 68 7 3 26 67   .553 .283
2008 TL ARKANSAS   32 123 13 34 7 1 6 25 1 2 7 29   .496 .276
2009 TL ARKANSAS   137 533 54 155 35 3 15 88 6 3 37 100 .333 .452 .291
2010 PCL SALT LAKE   139 532 103 159 29 5 36 122 3 4 58 126 .366 .575 .299
2010 AL ANGELS   8 15 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 8 .125 .067 .067
2011 AL ANGELS $414.00 149 539 65 137 31 1 29 87 9 4 25 120 .291 .477 .254
2012 AL ANGELS $500.00 144 544 66 146 19 3 32 95 4 5 36 153 .317 .491 .268
2013 AL ANGELS $540.00 159 620 85 145 30 2 34 100 5 2 54 184 .294 .453 .234
2014 NL DIAMONDBACKS $4,800.00 88 328 37 77 15 1 14 61 2 3 28 89 .293 .415 .235
2014 PCL RENO   3 11 6 5 0 0 3 6 0 0 1 2 .500 1.273 .455
2015 AL DIAMONDBACKS $6,900.00 46 174 23 45 10 3 9 23 0 0 10 39 .299 .506 .259
2015 AL MARINERS   96 334 39 88 13 0 13 41 0 0 26 93 .316 .419 .263
2016 AL ORIOLES $9,150.00 159 613 94 157 27 1 47 108 2 0 51 170 .316 .533 .256
2017 AL ORIOLES $11,000.00 146 559 79 131 22 0 23 65 1 0 42 149 .289 .397 .234
Personal
  • Trumbo pitched (hitting 91-97 mph) and played first base for Villa Park High School, in the shadows of Angel Stadium. He hit .425-6-25 in 2004, his senior year. He also impressed scouts with his well-rounded game in April at the National Classic, as Villa Park High won the nation's most prestigious high school tournament. And Mark was the event's most outstanding player.
  • In 2004, Mark signed a letter of intent to Southern Cal. His father is a huge USC fan. But at the last minute, on August 16, 2004, the Angels signed him, as a third baseman, which was a surprise. Most everyone else had Trumbo pegged for the pitcher's mound.
  • Mark grew up a big fan of the Angels, living in the neighborhood of Angels Stadium. He remembers watching power hitters Tim Salmon and Troy Glaus.
  • In 2005, Trumbo led the Pioneer League in doubles and ranked second in extra-base hits.

  • In 2006, Baseball America's Prospect Handbook rated Trumbo as 12th-best prospect in the Angels' organization. (They had him at #11 in the spring of 2005.) In the spring of 2007, they had Mark as 29th-best prospect in the Angels' farm system. And that is exactly where they had Trumbo in the spring of 2008, #29.

    In 2009, Baseball America's Prospect Handbook had Mark all the way up to 8th-best prospect in the Angels organization. They had him at #11 in the spring of 2010. And finally, he was ranked the 9th-best prospect in the Angels' farm system in the winter before 2011 spring training.

  • In 2010, Trumbo tied Mike Moustakas for the minor league lead with 36 homers. He also paced the PCL in runs (103), RBIs (122), and total bases (307).

    That year, the Angels named Mark their Minor League Player of the Year.

  • In 2011 Mark led all rookies with 29 home runs and 87 RBIs while batting .254 in his rookie campaign, but finished second in Rookie of the Year voting to Jeremy Hellickson of the Tampa Bay Rays.

  • A television analyst referred to Mark Trumbo and Mike Trout as "T 'n T"—a dynamite combination.

    The Oakland A’s stumbled out of the gate to an 18-25 record through May 21 2012. It was then that the 2012 TNT boys sparked an eight-game winning streak that put the Angels back into contention—and rekindled an old nickname.

  • Few players wear their passion on their sleeve like Trumbo.

    "I don't think anybody can care too much, but I definitely think he is a guy who's very difficult on himself; a lot of self-imposed pressure," Angels hitting coach Jim Eppard said. "As he brings that into better focus, as he matures, as he gains that experience as a Major League player, as a Major League hitter, those stretches are going to become shorter and shorter as we go."

  • Trumbo loves music. He listens to a variety of bands and plays several instruments, though he wishes he had more time to practice.

    "I play drums from time to time," Trumbo said. "I've played live a couple times, but I mostly do it for fun."

    Trumbo said he would not mind playing music for a career after baseball.

  • In 2014, Mark teamed up with some other players on the D-Backs to form a group. Fender Guitars has supplied a music room for the group to practice.

    Trumbo plays drums and lead guitar. Bronson Arroyo is on guitar and vocals. Wade Miley plays base guitar. Aaron Hill plays rhythm guitar. Kurt Gibson's oldest son plays guitar and sings. A.J Pollack is also in the band.

  • In 2016, Trumbo was named Sporting News' AL Comeback Player of the Year.

  • In 2016, Trumbo was selected as the AL's Comeback Player for the Players Choice Award.

  • Mark really fit in well with the Orioles. There could have been legitimate questions, considering Baltimore was Trumbo's fourth team in four years.

    "We thought he'd be a good fit with how our clubhouse works," Manager Buck Showalter said. "He's been a real contributor from that standpoint. He doesn't take himself too seriously. He is funny, dry and very humble. There are times when you are around him and he never thinks he's going to hit another home run . . . or he has never hit one in his whole life."

    TRANSACTIONS

  • June 2004: The Angels signed Mark to a $1.425 million contract after drafting him in the 18th round, out of Villa Park High School in Orange, California.

    That bonus set a record for a bonus for a non-draft-and-follow player selected after the 10th round. Tim Corcoran is the scout who signed him.

    Though most scouts had him as a pitcher, including the Angels, the more they looked at him over the summer of 2004, the more excited they got about his powerful bat. So they signed him as a first and third baseman.

  • December 10, 2013: In a three-team trade, the Diamondbacks received Trumbo from the Angels, along with two players to be named, one from the White Sox, one from the Angels. The D-Backs sent OF Adam Eaton to the White Sox and LHP Tyler Skaggs to the Angels. The Angels also received Hector Santiago from the White Sox.
  • February 7, 2014: Trumbo was signed to a one-year contract; according to one source, the deal is worth $4.8 million.
  • June 3, 2015: The Mariners sent C Welington Castillo and RHP Dominic Leone, along with OF Gabby Guerrero and INF Jack Renheimer to the Diamondbacks, so that they could acquire Trumbo and LHP Vidal Nuno.
  • December 2, 2015: The Orioles traded C Steve Clevenger to the Mariners for Trumbo and LHP C.J. Riefenhauser.
  • January 14, 2016: The Orioles and Trumbo avoided arbitration agreeing to a one-year deal for $9.1 million.
  • Nov 3, 2016: Trumbo elected free agency.
  • Jan 20, 2017: The Orioles resigned free agent Trumbo to a three-year deal worth $37.5 million.
Batting
  • Trumbo has power to mash some towering home runs. He pulls the ball a lot, but is learning to hit the ball all over the field. But he will have to improve his ability to make contact to fulfill his promising power. He needs to be less pull-conscious. But when he gets his arms extended, the ball goes a long way.

    "He really leverages the ball," Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. "He's got a simple swing for a young guy. He has shown functional power, not show power." In other words, he doesn't leave it on the field in batting practice. He's carrying his long ones into games, when it counts. (June 27, 2011)

  • Mark has a balanced swing. He enhances his plate coverage by employing a wider stance with virtually no stride, now. For sure, when he gets his arms extended he gets the backspin and blasts some long home runs.
  • He needs to improve his pitch recognition and discipline at the plate. And he has. He is now putting some quality at-bats together. He tightened up his approach with two strikes. But he still could improve his selectivity.

    Working with Angels' hitting coordinator Todd Takayoshi helped Trumbo hit to center and right field.

  • Mark is still a little bit too tempted by the high fastball.

    "Yeah, and I like hitting it, too. I’m not going to stop swinging at it. That’s part of my game," Trumbo said (in May 2011). "I feel like I can handle that pitch a lot better than the pitch down that’s maybe a ball."

  • Trumbo has problems hitting lefthanded pitchers. But he no longer chases off-speed stuff away.
  • Mark makes a lot of contact for a slugger, but he swings early in counts because he doesn't like to strike out. He has shown a willingness to take breaking pitches the other way, but he's still learning to control the strike zone and develop a sound two-strike approach. Some scouts doubt he has the bat speed to handle Major League fastballs.

    But most agree he can produce 25 home runs a season, because he does not have any glaring holes in his swing, though he does chase high heat. He won't ever hit for a high average because he swings and misses too often.

    "I'm a power hitter. My value lies in driving the ball and hitting home runs. I’m never going to give away an at-bat, but I also have a longer swing, so I’m probably going to miss more than guys who have higher contact rates. I’ve learned to accept that. I’m working to get better at it, but at the end of the day, it is what it kind of is," Trumbo said.

  • In May 2011, Mark increased his power production by making a mechanical adjustment.

    "I had a toe-tap thing going and I ditched that the other day in favor of a higher leg kick," Trumbo said. "That's what I used last year in Triple-A and I had kind of gotten away from it. I brought that back and it has helped me stay behind the ball a little better."

    Trumbo said his leg kick is similar to the batting style of Toronto's Jose Bautista.

  • When in a slump, he is fixated to an admittedly unhealthy degree. He can't think of anything else. He's cerebral, driven to study himself and other hitters, obsessed with finding a mechanical solution to his problem.

  • "In that lineup, you don't need Mark to hit .300. You need him to do some damage when guys are on base, and that's what he's done all year."  -- AL East relief pitcher (2016)

    "Jeez, what a year [2016 has been for Mark]. Him in that ballpark, that swing, in that lineup, that's a big difference-maker. There's some other production in that lineup that takes the pressure off of him. Don't throw the ball in the zone anywhere."  -- AL Central catcher

  • In 2016, Trumbo led the Majors with 47 home runs.

  • As of the start of the 2018 season, Trumbo's career numbers were: a .249 batting average with 201 home runs and 582 RBI in 3,726 at-bats.
Fielding
  • The Angels thought about playing Trumbo at third base, giving him another shot at it during 2012 spring training, but he lacks the agility and range for the position. He has the arm for third base, but Mark's size (6-foot-4) may hamper his ability to play third.

    That arm was clocked at 96 mph when he was a pitcher in high school. But it is obvious that his arm strength has waned since then, because his arm is not that strong, now.

  • His hands are adequate at first base, but his range is rather limited. Mark doesn't have mobility. He lacks life in his body, with his actions and reactions being slow.
  • Trumbo has a great arm, but lacks the range and speed to play right field, or any other outfield position as a matter of fact.
  • During 2012 spring training, he was moved to third base to make room for Albert Pujols at first. Trumbo was confident he would make the routine plays and that he would improve. 

    Angels coach Alfredo Griffin said the key is for Trumbo to find a comfort zone. For the coaching staff, that means not overloading him with too much information at once.

    "We hit a ground ball, he picks it up, throws to first base, and we correct the mechanics once in a while," Griffin said of the team's philosophy on transitioning Trumbo. "We're not putting too much in his head. We're just letting him develop by himself."

    One area Trumbo admittedly needed work on is fielding and throwing slow rollers, which will always be a tough ball for him to get low on and twist for the accurate throw.

  • In 2011 with the Angels, first baseman Trumbo led the American League in putouts with 1,284.

  • Not long into the 2012 season, the Angels made Trumbo into a corner outfielder.

  • Trumbo used to play some first base and third base, but not anymore. Just outfield. (2017)
Running
  • Mark doesn't have much in the way of speed. And he is not a very good baserunner.
Career Injury Report
  • April 2007: Trumbo went on the D.L. after he was struck on the wrist by a pitch. He returned to action in two weeks.
  • September 26, 2011: Mark was sidelined for the last few games of the season with a stress fracture in his right foot. He had played with the pain for about six weeks, but it became too much. A  battery of tests, including an X-ray, an MRI and a CT scan, uncovered a stress fracture of the navicular bone on the top of the foot. The fracture was expected to heal naturally, without surgery.

    "It's been bothering me for about a month and a half," said Trumbo. "It got to a point where I felt very limited. I felt it could cost us if I wasn't able to get to a ball."

  • April 23-July 11, 2014: Trumbo was on the D.L. with a stress fracture in his left foot. An MRI also revealed some plantar fasciitis, which Trumbo had been dealing with since spring training. Trumbo wasn't sure how the stress fracture developed but thought he was overcompensating due to the plantar fasciitis.

  • July 30-August 9, 2017: Mark was on he DL with a strained right rib cage.